Our Practises

 
 
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Hatha (The original teaching)

Hatha is a Sanskrit word that can be broken down into two smaller words: ha, meaning “sun,” and tha, meaning “moon.” The word may also mean “wilful” or "forceful.”. In yoga, Hatha yoga is one of many types of yoga practice.

The practice of Hatha yoga focuses on total mastery of the physical body, including all bodily functions:-- Hatha is a general category that includes most yoga styles. It is an old system that includes the practice of asanas (yoga postures) and pranayama (breathing exercises), which help bring peace to the mind and body, preparing the body for deeper spiritual practices such as meditation.

In most cases, it will be relatively gentle, slow and great for beginners or students who prefer a more relaxed style where they hold poses longer.

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Vinyasa

Vinyāsa is a Sanskrit term often employed in relation to certain styles of yoga, that usually refers to a transition between two different positions. Like many Sanskrit words, vinyāsa has many meanings; nyasa denotes "to place" and vi denotes "in a special way". The term "Vinyāsa" can also be used to reference a style of yoga practised as one breath, tied to one movement.

Like hatha, vinyasa is a general term that describes many different styles of yoga. It essentially means movement synchronised with breath and is a vigorous style based on a rapid flow through sun salutations. You may also see a vinyasa class referred to as a flow class, which refers to the continuous flow from one posture to the next.

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Yin

Yin is the feminine, dark, passive, receptive, reflective, withdrawn, cool, introspective aspects of life. Yin yoga was developed to penetrate deep into connective tissue expanding flexibility while invigorating the energy centres of the body (nadis) to release blockages and increase your energy flow.

Yin yoga is a slow-paced style in which poses are held for five minutes or longer. Even though it is passive, yin yoga can be quite challenging due to the long holds, particularly if your body is not used to it. The purpose is to apply moderate stress to the connective tissue - the tendons, fascia and ligaments - with the aim of increasing circulation in the joints and improving flexibility.

It was founded and first taught in the U.S. in the late 1970s by martial arts expert and Taoist yoga teacher Paulie Zink. Yin-style is now begin taught across North America and in Europe, due in large part to two of the more prominent instructors, Paul Grilley and Sarah Powers.

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Aerial

Anti-Gravity Yoga or "aerial yoga", is a new type of yoga, originating in New York but now being practised in several countries, which combines the traditional yoga poses, Pilates and dance with the use of a hammock.

The ACE researchers figured there would be full-body firming. "Study participants increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass all over, so it's likely that aerial yoga provides strength-building benefits," Dalleck says. (Expect to see definition in your shoulders and arms especially, Duggan says.) But the scientists were surprised at just how cardio intensive this form of yoga can be. "At the outset of the study, we didn't necessarily anticipate that the physiological responses to aerial yoga would align with those of other, more traditional forms of cardio exercises, like cycling and swimming," Dalleck says. They found that the calorie burn—320 calories in one 50-minute aerial yoga session—is in fact comparable to that of power walking.

It's zero-impact

Whether or not you have knee problems, adding some low- or no-impact workouts is great for you ,and aerial classes are exactly that easy on the joints, Dalleck says.

You'll walk away feeling Zen

Research shows that mind-body activities can reduce stress, and aerial yoga is no exception. Many classes end with you lying in savasana, cocooned in a hammock as you gently swing from side to side. Talk about blissing out!